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ANTIQUE & CLASSIC MOTORCYCLES

A lifetime of motorcycles.

Whizzer -- A bicycle with a small 4 stroke, side valve motor with a single speed belt drive, for street riding only. (My first bike at fourteen and spent most of its time riding gravel back roads.) 1947-1955

Puch -- A small street bike with a 250cc, 2 stroke "T" bone single with chain drive and right side foot shift and left side rear break. (Nice bike but high vibration at road speeds. It was built by Puch out of Austria in Europe and imported by Sears and sold under the name Allstate. 1960-1966

Bridgestone -- All Bridgestone had 2 stroke engines from 50CC to 300CC single and twins. (I had and rode all models they built. Bridgestone bikes had more power output then any other bikes of that day.) This was the time I had a Bridgestone Dealer ship. 1967-1970

Home Built Minibike -- With a Honda 4 stroke, 60cc engine and transmission from a crashed street bike. (A real fun bike and very fast for a small minibike, 55MPH plus if you had the guts to push it.)

Yamaha - 250cc, 2 stroke, dirt bikes and 350 and 400cc twin cylinder street bikes. (The dirt bikes were good but on the heavy side. The 350cc twin, 2 stroke had more power then the 400cc, but the vibration at road speed was less on the 400.)

Kawasaki - 250, 400cc, 2 stroke dirt bikes, 500cc, 2 stroke, triple and a 1300cc, 6 cylinder, 4 stroke street bike and 600, 650cc, 4 stroke, single, on road/off road bikes. (The 250cc dirt bike was underpowered but the 400cc had the power just right and turned out to be one of the most fun dirt bikes I ever owned. The 500cc, triple was the crotch rocket of its day for sure, but you had to watch out on the curves.) (The 1300cc had 120HP and was a dream to ride on the open highway and had zero vibration at any speed, but was a hand full in the city because of the heavy weight. This bike would to 0 to 60MPH in about 3.2 seconds in first gear if you kelp the front wheel on the ground.)(The 650cc KLX on road/off road was the last bike I owned and the best one for the dirt and the road I ever owned. It loved the winding mountain paved roads and you could just turn off onto the most rugged mountain jeep trail and it would haul your butt anywhere you wanted to go for sure with the cushiest ride they have ever built into a off road bike.)

Rokon - 350cc, 2 stroke, on road/off road with mag wheels and rope pull starter and driven by a variable ratio belt drive. (Good off road bike but on the heavy side. A dream to ride up hills and in mud and with the variable drive always in the right gear for max power output.) This is the bike I took to San Francisco, CA and rode on many of the roads around the area plus the Golden Gate Bridge. We also rode at the cycle ranch at Hollister, CA for a day on this trip in 1975.

Honda - 305cc, 4 stroke twin (Dream) street bike, 400cc, 4 stroke, twin, street bike. 500cc, 4 stroke, V twin, turbo, street bike. 500cc, 4 stroke, single, on road/off road bike. Plus 100cc, 4 stroke, single, three-wheeler and 250cc, 2 stroke, single, three-wheeler. (The 305cc Dream had the sweets sound from the dual pipes of any motorcycle I ever owned and a pleasure to ride at speed with no vibration.) (The 400cc, 4 stroke, twin was a great small street bike, with little vibration at road speed.) (The 500cc turbo was the best bike I ever owned for riding winding mountain roads, as the altitude had no effect on its power output. This bike would pull the same 0 to 60MPH times at 12,000 feet and it did at sea level. A real smoker for sure and the one bike I should have never sold. It did vibrated bad at slow highway speeds like 55MPH but at about 80MPH up it was as smooth as any bike I ever owned.)(The 250cc, three-wheeler was a blast to play in the dirt with. It loved the sand dunes in The Little Sahara Park in Oklahoma. It a shame that the government outlawed then as they were much more fun then the four wheelers they build today and if you learned how to ride them correctly they were just as safe if not more so as they were not near as heavy.

My first bike when I was 14 -- a 1947 S10 Whizzer motorbike on a red & white Schwinn bicycle .

When I was fourteen I was able to take over the paper route for our small town. Only a few customers, but I could still make twelve to fifteen dollars a month. With the route money and any other money I could get my hands on I had the $165.00 it cost for a new Whizzer motorbike in short order. With much congoling I finely got Mom and Dad to agree to let me buy the bike. I said I had to have it for the paper route. Truth was I wanted the Whizzer to expand my search for sex also.

My next bike was years later. After a stint in the Army, I returned to Collage to study Electrical Engineering. Going to Collage was expensive even back in the old days, thus I was always out of money and having a motorcycle was out of the question.

Things changed when I finished collage and landed my first real job. I had some spare change then and was able to purchase a used Sear (Allstate by Puch) 250cc road bike. This was in the early 1960's.

The old Puch 250cc bike was a good road cruiser. It had an unusual T-bone 2 cycle motor which gave very good gas mileage but did shake bad at highway speed. It would put you hands and feet asleep after a few hours on the road.

I had a 1954 Chevrolet car at the time with a trailer-hitch. I built a hitch mount for the front axle of the old Puch bike. Thus with the front wheel pulled and the axle installed in the hitch mount the bike stood lock in the vertical position rolling along on the rear tire. With the chain and the front wheel in the Chevrolet's trunk I trailed the Puch without a trailer to many parts of Texas and Colorado for several years.

In 1965 I made a trip to Colorado with my Father and Mother in my new chassis mount camper and found this Bridgestone 60 Sport for rent by the hour in Colorado Springs. I had never seen this brand of Japanese bike before and was curious as to how it would perform. It was only 60cc but to my surprise the little motor had no trouble hauling my ass up the mountain roads and trails. By the way my ass was a lots lighter in those days.

The little 2 cycle motor had a rotary valve intake system that make the power band very flat and the top RPM very high. The overall quality of finish and fit was very good for the cost of the Bridgestone line of motorcycles.

I checked with Bridgestone when I got back to Texas and found that dealerships were available. Well as they say, the rest is history. I setup a dealership and started with seven bikes and a rent shop at a local lake. The rent shop was a blast. I found that I had to add bikes as on weekends all seven bikes would be out most of each day.

A year or so later the State of Texas killed the rent business with a new law that required you to have a special license to ride a motorcycle of any size and very few people had such license thus the motorcycle renting business was dead.

As a results of this I rented a small building in a strip mall in Fort Worth and opened a shop selling Bridgestone motorcycles. This worked out good as we were selling a few bikes over the next few years.

While all this was going on Bridgestone came out with a 100cc factory racing motorcycle that the dealers could buy to promote the business so I ordered one of the bikes.

I had a friend that had a young teenage son that was just getting into riding and wanted to get into racing motorcycle so bad he could taste it. The young teenager had a 100cc Bridgestone Sport bike and he had taken it to one or two flat-track races in the past and loved it so we made a deal for him to ride the new 100cc factory racer that I had. The factory bike was lighter and had more power that the standard 100cc sport model. Thus he began to win lots of the races.


First place on the right with the young teenager of the left getting second place at Lake Lavon Race Track, Lavon, Texas in the late 1960s.


An example of the Yamaha RD350.


An example of the Yamaha RD400 from 1977.


An example of the Kawasaki KX400 dirt bike one of the most fun dirt bikes I ever owned.


An example of the Kawasaki 500 Triple Crotch-Rocket of tis day in a stright line but watch out for the curves.


And just look at what people are doing with these bikes today. 750cc with 3 250cc jugs now add two more 250cc jugs and you have a rocket with 1250cc of power.


This is the bike I went for with its 1300cc of six cylinders power at 120HP and one of the smoothest road bikes I ever owned but it was a hand full in the city because it was very heavy.


Rokon - 350cc, 2 stroke, on road/off road with mag wheels and rope pull starter and driven by a variable ratio belt drive. (Good off road bike but on the heavy side. A dream to ride up hills and in mud and with the variable drive always in the right gear for max power output.) This is the bike I took to San Francisco, CA and rode on many of the roads around the area plus the Golden Gate Bridge. We also rode at the cycle ranch at Hollister, CA for a day on this trip in 1975.


The 305cc Dream had the sweets sound from the dual pipes of any motorcycle I ever owned and a pleasure to ride at speed with no vibration.


The 500cc turbo was the best bike I ever owned for riding winding mountain roads, as the altitude had no effect on its power output. This bike would pull the same 0 to 60MPH times at 12,000 feet and it did at sea level. A real smoker for sure and the one bike I should have never sold. It did vibrated bad at slow highway speeds like 55MPH but at about 80MPH up it was as smooth as any bike I ever owned.


The bike I am riding today. After this picture was made I add a lowering kit to the rear suspension which dropped the bike seat by about three inches which is much better for this old man for the easer riding I now do most of which is on the street today.

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